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  • History Of The Land Registry

    The Land Laws of Belize are derived mainly from the Common Law and English Statutes of the 19th century. This statute governs all land transactions of Belize.

    It was the consequence of a consultancy study in 1972 founded by the British Government which highlighted the problems and inadequacies with land registration in Belize Subsequently recommendations were accepted and action taken by the Government of Belize.

    The Belize Land Registry of the Land and Surveys Department was officially opened in May, 1978 after the enactment of the Registered Land Ordinance 1977 currently the Registered Land Act.

    The Registered Land Act was aimed at providing for security of land ownership or tenure and expediting the granting of leases and titles at a low cost. Transfers, accordingly becomes easier, quicker and cheaper. The Registered Land Act also provides for the declaration of compulsory registration areas, registration procedures and prescribed forms and means of dealing in registered land.

    Other Services offered

    The Belize Land Registry records the details of all land transaction within the Compulsory Land Registration area, together with a Interactive Map which indicates (and in certain cases defines) the boundaries of each individually owned parcel of land. This role provides for the maintenance of a LandFolio database of some 57,000 parcel registers defining ownership and other interests in land such as Leases, Rights of Way and Charges. The Land Register updated on each occasion to ensure that the general public can obtain accurate and up to date Land Registry information at all times.

    We offer advice to our customers through our publications and enquiry services and through the day-to-day handling of applications. We provide factual information including official copies of registers, title plans and documents, searches and details of our forms and fees. We provide procedural advice to explain how the land registration system works and how to make applications correctly. We do not offer legal advice

    In addition to the Registration of land transactions, the Land Registry also undertakes the following services, for which a fee may be payable:

    • Provision of Land Registry information to the general public, including copies of the Land Register and Registry Maps, and supporting documentation;

    Maintenance of a Strata Plan Book, including the By-Laws of a Strata;

    Issuance of Land and Lease Certificates (now broadly obsolete);

    Preparation and Witnessing of Land Registration Documentation

    Information about our guide

    The information in this publication is for the purpose of providing general guidance about Land Registry’s procedures and policies. It is intended only as a guide and does not cover every situation that may arise. It also does not limit Land Registry’s ability to use its discretion when appropriate to do so, within the land registration legislation.

    Land Registry advisory policy

    We offer advice to our customers through our publications and enquiry services and through the Day-to-day handling of applications. We provide factual information including official copies of registers, title plans and documents, searches and details of our forms and fees. We provide procedural advice to explain how the land registration system works and how to make applications correctly.

    This includes

    • advice in advance of an application, where this is requested
    • where an application is defective, advice as to the nature of the problem and what options, if any, are available to put it right
    • An approval service for estate layout plans and certain other land registration documents.

    There are limits to the advice that we will provide. We will not provide legal advice. This means that:

    • We will not approve the evidence to be produced in support of a registration application before we receive the application.
    • Apart from procedural advice, we will not advise on what action to take.
    • We will not recommend a professional adviser but can explain how to find one.

    We provide advice only about real cases, not about theoretical circumstances. We will not express a view on questions where the law is complex or unclear except where the question arises on a live registration application. In providing this factual information and procedural advice we will:

    • be impartial
    • recognise that others may be affected by what we say
    • Avoid any conflict of interest.